Downs Syndrome and Cri de chat syndrome   

 

There is a genetic problem called "Downs Syndrome" which is best described in the link http://www.downs-syndrome.org.uk/

which can be reached either directly or by going to the Downs Syndrome Association UK who have an extensive site to help those born with an  extra chromosome 21 - Downs Syndrome.

There are almost 120 symptoms of Downs Syndrome, which include (thank you, Sarah Williams):-

  She writes that general (but no means specific) symptoms are:  

 

* Face ; When looked at from the front, the child with Downs syndrome usually has a round face, and from the side, the face tends to have a flat profile

* Head ; The back of the head is slightly flattened in most people with Downs syndrome. This is known as brachycephally.

* Hair ; The hair of children with Downs syndrome is usually soft and straight.

* Neck ; New born babies with Downs syndrome may have excess skin over the back of the neck, but this is usually taken up as they grow older. Children and adults tend to have short, broad necks.

* Mouth ; The mouth cavity is usually slightly smaller than average and the tongue slightly larger. This can lead to speech problems

* Hands ; The hands tend to be broad, with short fingers. The little finger sometimes has only one joint instead of two. This finger may also be slightly curved towards the other fingers. The palm may have only one crease going across it.

* Feet ; These tend to be stubby and have a wide space between the first and second toes.

It seems from what little I have read about this subject, that Downs Syndrome leads to a tendency towards dementia in middle and old aged people, and is also associated with learning difficulties.   Behavioural problems are not unknown, but then - you don't neccessarily need to be a Downs child to be that, do you?

 

Or do you?

Cri de chat syndrome

 

Another similar syndrome involving hearing, speech and apparent age is the Cri-de-chat syndrome, so named afte the cat-like cry given off by the sufferer,  It is well described in http://www.sos.se/smkh/2001-110-16/2001-110-16.htm which is a link to a Danish databank.   Many thanks to them.